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Showing posts from February 15, 2009

Fujifilm F200EXR High ISO Samples

(At ISO 1600, this photo proves what Fujifilm claims in IQ with the EXR sensor. I have no complain really about the image at such a high ISO for a compact like this) The high ISO IQ is not really comparable to a proper DSLR’s.  But the F200EXR is so portable that, coupled with the wide lens and the agreeable high ISO performance up to ISO 1600 IMO, it is a dream comes true.If case you missed the previous post on some background of what a EXR CCD can do, check it out here.The dynamic range seems really better than the shots done with other serious compacts available on the market.  Now, the samples:Day ShotsISO10020040080016003200640012800
Night ShotsISO10020040080016003200640012800(Photos by Kitamura)More Shots
(At ISO 1600, F9 1/60s) ISO80016003200 (At ISO 1600, F3.3  1/42s)HUGH  DIFFERENCEF200EXR  @ ISO8001600F100 fd      @ ISO8001600(Photo by kakaku)

Selected Excellence: Portrait Lens

Traditionals have a term for lens to take portraits with. They call it, obviously, portrait lens. Some may point to you that a "standard" portrait lens for a 35mm camera is a 135mm lens, while others say that it should be 105mm. There are also some specific way for using a portrait lens as how it is supposed to be used. Take for example, dial up the f stops to a smaller number when using the longer focal lengths to render the subject completely in focus, you would be told. Of course, for camera of other formats, the "standard" portrait lens have different focal length requirements.So, what about portrait lens for a compact?Let's look at the causal portrait shots here done with a fixed lens of Sigma DP1 by SY Hsu, who has been introduced to readers here and here before. With the fantastic portrait works under his belt (lucky him mostly for beauties) and the portrait works awards (here, here and here)he won from PX3, he offers us some brief insights of his about …

The Magic of Fog

How would you use your compact, be it a GX200, GRDII, LX3, G10 or whatsoever, to say your objection in an image against a bad idea?Take for example a short-sighted redevelopment project. The following photos are examples taken from my on-going assignment on urban redevelopment.(Looking Down Upon: The tall buildings stick out behind the low blocks and into the thick fog. Look at their top floors with some structural features shaping like evil triangular eyes. They were what caught my eye. I can easily imagine them as gazing at the old tenement blocks at their feet, relaying a message of the greedy property developers, “We will lick you up, shorties.” The mysterious atmosphere surrounding the evil messagers would not be possible without the fog)(Ghosts Looming Over: A wider view affords another interpretation that the tall buildings are actually ghosts looming up from nowhere and going to make its way through the low blocks regardless. The tall buildings masked by the fog appear much mo…

Stories of Wooden Carts

(On Collison Course: This photo was taken at the Fruits Wholesale Market, a must-go for any photographer visiting Hong Kong. But beware that taking pictures of the workers there can get you cursed and bullied with four-letter words. Co-incidentally, the most common Cantonese foul expressions are also in four syllables. So, you should be able to know it when people with fierce eyes speak them to you. Interestingly, the most well-known Japanese foul expression is also in four syllables. This may bring us to some Chomskian discussion on the connection of anger, mothers and languages)In Hong Kong, wooden carts come in many different sizes and shapes. Unlike other big cities, the metal version which you see in the offices are the minority here. Instead, these omnipotent wooden ones are ubiquituous. You see them in snack kiosks, eateries, factories, marketplaces, schools and rubbish collection stations, you name it.(Limousine and Chauffeur: This garbage collection man shouts to passers-by t…

Almost Got Killed

(Modern Wash: The image reminds me of a Chinese wash painting with exception of the theme on buildings rather than mountains. The wash of grey silhouette is what caught my eye at the scene. The airspace above the buildings was once the landing route to the old international airport in Hong Kong)Until the old international airport was decommissioned, I often went up a hill which commanded a view to the landing route. I went there for plane spotting. The hill was actually a landmark for pilots to take the last turn to align planes with the airstrip. Landmarks are important for pilots, as told to me by a late WWII co-pilot who was my friend, as tangible way points to complement the electronics aboard. On the hill I could have been killed.I am still not sure whether the pilot drink-flew or the electronics malfunctioned on that unforgettable ocassion. I was on the hill, standing on a narrow strip by the steep slope, and watched planes landing as usual. After a while, a Boeing 737 plane ca…

Now You See It, Now You Don't

(You See It or Not: This glass pane is one of my favorite places to take street shots. The reflections change with the light. The reflections appear when abundant light is shed on the glass, and fade a bit if the light turns dim on it. They toggles between the two, on and off with passers-by turning round from and into behind the glass. This puzzles the mind whether the image through the glass is real or illusionary)This is Monday. The cleaning lady is getting ready at her workplace by the bustling Nathan Road. Now, she is wheeling a big yellow thing along. The big yellow thing has a jargon for it, Si Lo Bo, or literally Little Robot. Si Lo Bo is, in fact, a name adopted for any big, automatic unknown-for-the-its-name machine since it was used for a character in a Japanese children's programme aired in Hong Kong in the 70s. So, there are Si Lo Bo this and Si Lo Bo that. This Si Lo Bo is actually a high pressure water sprayer.It took her some five minutes to set up the hose with th…

What's in Super CCD EXR + Comparative Shots for Fuijifilm F200EXR

(Note: There is an educational video introducing this CCD at the end of the post ) (ISO1600 / High-sensitivity low-noise priority (EXR mode))The hot stuff of the day is Fujifilm's F200EXR. Offering a useful focal length from 28mm to 140mm, Fujifilm gives the camera manual controls (no shutter priority mode) with a 1/1.6” Super CCD EXR heart claimed to deliver superb IQ, especially in terms of high ISO performance and a wider dynamic range. The aperture at the widest opening should be made, however, wider than f/3.3-5.1. Comparative Shots If you haven't checked out the samples (thumbnails shown at left) by DC Watch, check them out here.To get an idea if the EXR CCD does as good as Fujifilm claims, see its sample galleries forF31fd, F40fd and F60fd.And if you haven't read about what's special about the Super CCD EXR, and what it can do to improve image quality, the following is what Fujifilm said says about the technology. (譯文)----------Some BackgroundThere is strong de…