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Showing posts from March 29, 2009

LNII Series: Mr Forgetful

LNII stands for Lower Ngau Tau Kwok (II) Estate, the last resettlement estate to be redeveloped in Hong Kong. You may wish to read first five instalments of this series here, here, here, here and here. The photos presented in this series were taken by me with my GX200 during my two visits to the estate. Today, let's meet an interesting man.(A customer shows up from the barbershop)Yesterday, we read some stories about the old-style Shanghainese barbershops. Just as I was ready to leave the Hei Lin Beauty Parlour, an old man showed up through the back door. Obviously, he had just had an haircut at Hei Lin."Take photos of me," he kept saying, pointing an index finger to himself.That was the moment absolutely welcomed by any photographer. At once, I uncapped the GX200 and turned it on. "Click! Click! Click!" went the camera shutter.(Walking along the dark corridor adjoining the back door of the barbershop) "Take more, take more," he was apparently in a hi…

LNII Series: Shanghainese Barbershop

LNII stands for Lower Ngau Tau Kwok (II) Estate, the last resettlement estate to be redeveloped in Hong Kong. You may wish to read first four instalments of this series here, here, here and here. The photos presented in this series were taken by me with my GX200 during my two visits to the estate. Today, we visit an old barbershop in LNII.(Busy photographers with all sorts of cameras outside the barbershop) This is Hei Lin Wah Beauty Parlour. This sort of old barbershop is commonly known as Shanghainese barbershop in Hong Kong, for a reason.Shanghainese this and Shanghainese that are a rather nostalgic, sentimental way of naming things passed down by the older generations. The utterance of the word Shanghai alone was powerful enough to evoke a reminiscence of its glorious past until the late 1940s, a time when Shanghainese flocked to the south for a reason we know very well. There was such a large amount of them fleeing to Hong Kong that all the Northerners became indiscriminately ta…

LNII Series: Stores of Yore

(This is the biggest paper tiger I have ever seen for the offering ceremony on one of the 24 traditional Chinese solar periods called "Gink Zug" [literally, Waking of Insects Day]. More on this in the post)LNII stands for Lower Ngau Tau Kwok (II) Estate, the last resettlement estate to be redeveloped in Hong Kong. You may wish to read first three instalments of this series here, here and here. The photos presented in this series were taken by me with my GX200 during my two visits to the estate. This time let's walk around the neighbour together to check out some of the old shops still up and running after some 40 years.Having weathered a history of 40 years, LNII is a monument to the old days nearly forgotten in this city. The moment I stepped into the estate on my two visits, it was like a click of fingers and "SNAP!" I was back in history. I walked past time-worn shops, seeing the old ways of life intact. Everything seemed having been a déjà vu frozen in time…

F200EXR: User's Comparison Shots

If you are really think the previous post with some F200EXR samples by users not enough, the following photos are for your futher reference. All photos are published with courtesy and copyright of Philip form Malaysia. Thank you, Philip.F200EXRFull Size (small)HR modeDR modeISO 400ISO 800ISO 1600ISO 100% CropISO 400ISO 800ISO 1600Comparative ShotsF31fdF200EXRD90ISO 100% Crop100100100200200200400400400800800800Full Size (small)1600160016003200320032006400640012800

So You Want to Read Reviews

(When you are old enough, you should be smart enough to use the right tool for finding the right target.  The photo was taken in the busy Causeway Bay on the Hong Kong Island shortly after a rude gweilo* crossed my way, bumped into me and sticked up his middle finger to me.  He was politely rebuked) A reader asks me whether I think the F200EXR or the CX1 is better.Actually, I wrote a relevant post on choosing cameras here before. This open reply is a supplement to it.What People Read in a ReviewAs the idiom goes “Every medal has its reverse”, the same can be said of the digital era. Whenever there is a new camera, there seems to be an immediate demand for it. For one thing, of course, the versatility of digital cameras has opened up the market further into, so to speak, the uncharted waters. For another, users have been taught – or maybe “misled” - to be too specifications savvy, which is not preferable.Since the Fujifilm F200EXR and the Ricoh CX1 saw the light of the market, there ha…

Harbour at Dusk

At dawn and dusk, the light is characteristically ‘cold’ and blue, which can produce wonderfully atmospheric low-light shots.I have read that most landscape shots are best taken using the Daylight setting, since this forces the camera to use a fixed, standardised colour balance and prevents it from “correcting” the colour of the natural light. Well, I took these photos with the GX200 on auto WB.  Maybe next time I should try to stick to the Daylight setting to check out the difference.The photos were shot in sequence on the waterfront at Tsim Sha Tsim, Hong Kong.