Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from September 6, 2009

The Year's Most Interesting Pictures

^A Bavarian holds on to her rational sleigh in an annual race in southern Germany.Having been bombarded by the news and reviews and hand-ons of the new exciting cameras, we are more seriously numbed than ever.  It's time to neutralise ourselves with what photography is exactly about: T-A-K-I-N-G  P-H-O-T-O-S!
^Jason Romero fishes in Bremerton, Wash., as the clouds are reflected in the calm, serene water.Here are the screenshots of the most interesting pictures of the year featuring in a CNN site.  Going through the photos, I am impressed by the works but more by the saying that it's all luck.^Participants at the annual Engadin skiing marathon are on their way from Maloya to S-Chanf in southeastern Switzerland.It's not really that the photographers can take better pictures than you do.  Well, yes if considering their ability to predict and manage to get the right position.  That's intuitive to them after years of practice.  But more importantly, the pictures were done wi…

Good (and) Grief

Over the past few days, We have reviewed the CX1 for its major features and functions as a secondary camera to a serious compact.  The credentials of any point-and-shooter to qualify it as such are: » pricing (cheaper enough to save the serious compact in rougher conditions like when raining or hiking at night with gear around)» the lens' range of focal length (preferably 24 to 200mm; anything beyond 200mm is okay if the differences in price and optical quality are slight)» the degree of manual controlsResponsiveness and portability of the camera are assumed and therefore left out from the above criteria.I have been using the CX1 for around two months.  The shutter count is 600.  There is not one shot failed in focusing or exposure, save for the suspected issue I mentioned about the lens retraction at 135mm after determining the focus.  But whether this is a bug issue or simply a coincidence is to be explored further.  At least the problem is more noticeable for insufficiently lit…

Long Zoom, Shallow Field and Panoramic Vista

We are nearing to the end of the CX1 review series. Before rounding up my verdicts in the next post, we'll look at the longest reach of the CX1 lens and the related discussion. This is the sixth posts of the review series.^A cafe at the Peak. Taken at 85mm. A major reason I wished for an auxiliary camera to my GX200 is that even though I don't frequently shoot at a longer focal length, it is good to have the capability to zoom farther coming in handy. To all serious compacts at present, discounting the M4/3 models, the longer reach of the lens is not really long. There is a workaround solution to this by attaching a conversion lens. But for people like me and for reason of operation, a P&S with a long zoom capability is a better option.The first thing sprang to mind about using a 200mm focal length was to trip to the Peak. It is in capital letter and absolutely not a typo. The Peak is not the highest point of the ranges embracing the Kowloon Peninsular and the Hong Kong Is…

Roaming and Rummage

This is the fourth post of the CX1 review series written in a photographic journal sort of writing. In this post, we'll rummage the CX1 to check out its credentials as a serious compact's companion, namely, the elbowroom for manual controls.^The test started in a rather rundown neighbourhood. To be true to the atmosphere, I locked the exposure after metering a brighter spot and shot the photo. If left to itself, the camera would have exposed the scene to become brighter and the gloominess gone. Read on to see how this AEL is possible with the CX1.The ultimate credential that a point-and-shooter can be called a serious compact's companion is in its responsiveness in a less costly, more intuitive compact body which features an adequate degree of manual controls. We have discussed CX1's responsiveness in start-up and focusing. The manual control aspect is what to be probed into here.To test the nitty-gritty of the CX1's capability for manual controls, it is best to us…

Night Scene Times Dynamic Range

This is the third post of the CX1 review series.   Instead of the usual unexciting reviews , I will do the review posts in a photographic journal sort of writing.  This is how: I will write about how I used the camera in a real life situation, supplemented with some verdicts on certain review item which is the DR mode for this post.^An open-air eating place in the street at the well known Temple Street night market.  This is a typical example of illegal use of the shop front area for more business at zero cost.Hong Kong people has a reputation of being street smart.  It is simply a humble quality borne to any one living in a densely populated city largely left to their own fate.  During the colonial days under British's rein that is.  This quality has become a common heirloom of the people here passing from one generation to another.The effect is that the locals can somehow work around almost every problem if they can't fix it.  Some years ago I met with a Singaporean minister…

Enchanted Rather by Drowsiness

This photo of the lot sent in by Christopher Guy is better suited for the usual light Sunday post.  An amusing contrast it is.  In the image may be an implication of feminism.Women hold lots of important positions in Hong Kong.Have a nice day.