Saturday, 30 July 2011

Compete

R1232281L (Ricoh GX200)

The good about the weekend is that it is like having a truce for most of the competitions in life.

Friday, 29 July 2011

A Fine Day

R1232076L (Ricoh GX200)

Lonely Planet Hong Kong & Macau (City Travel Guide)The approach of weekend always liberates the burdened heart of the working men and women. In Hong Kong, there are many small islands where people can refresh their body and mind at weekend. Lamma Island is one of such islands. If you come to Hong Kong for a visit, don't miss the trekking from one end to the other end of Lamma Island. The three hours track is on easy level. There are some interesting things to see on Lamma too, which the author is going to show you next week.  

Thursday, 28 July 2011

To Echo Your Subject

DSC01552L (Sony A55)

While admirers of the romantic orange sky at sunset aimed at the sun and took unlimited shots of it against the tinted background, the author took notice of the foreground to give some echo to the fireball. Interestingly, unlike backgrounds which photographers may meticulously add or subtract from the final images, the foreground is more often overlooked. In fact, whereas the background is always there to appear with the subject, selection of the foreground requires a trained eye and a good sense. Photographers can use the foreground to give further interest, reference or substance to the primary subjects.

Next time before you take a shot, walk the scene and look around.  You will certainly spot a useful foreground for the final image.

Wednesday, 27 July 2011

Si

DSC01306L (Sony A55)

This Chinese character is pronounced as "si". The ways to form Chinese characters are six-fold, one of which is associative compounds, or Hui Yi.  The word "si" is a case in point. It compounds the Chinese characters of "one" and "ten", implying a complete cycle or starting well and ending well. In ancient Chinese, "si" was equal to a complementary salutation to men.

"Si" can be prefixed or suffixed with other characters to form new words, which is a typical ways of word formation in Chinese. For example, when prefixed with "person" it means "scholar" while the meaning is "adviser" if "scheme" is suffixed to "si".

In all circumstances, "si" encompasses a positive meaning. Words formed with this element has a positive connotation in general, unless a overriding word with negative meaning is paired with it. For example, "sei (death) si" means suicidal martyr.

(All pronunciations are in Cantonese)

Tuesday, 26 July 2011

Lines and Shapes

DSC01620L (Sony A55)

In a way, the world and all the contents in it can be deconstructed into their most elementary forms as lines and shapes. One of the training for painters is to give them drawing exercises on themes of lines and shapes. When one acquires the artistic skill to interpret objects and subjects in lines and shapes, one has the ability to reconstruct them into unlimited creative combinations in the final works. The same is applicable to photography.

Monday, 25 July 2011

Kungfu Panda, Sidekick and Photography

DSC02052L (Sony A55; the translucent effect was make possible by the DRO mode)

As we always promote, growing oneself in photography takes more than just studying and practising photography. Aspirants after mastery of photography should take on a mutli-directional approach; that is to say, gain exposure to different genres of art. For that matter, watching movie is an easy and enjoyable option.

DSC02048L (Sony A55; a red panda, also known as "little panda" in Chinese)

A recent beautifully done blockbuster hit is Kungfu Panda Two. There are, for example, a couple of low-angel "shots" which may remind you of the powerful vista of a scenery from such an angel of view. You will certainly notice some other skills to apply to photography.

In passing, pandas and red pandas are kept in the Hong Kong Ocean Park.

Sunday, 24 July 2011

Body Language 2

R0010261L (Camera: Ricoh GX200)

Striding with full confidence in herself.

This is Sunday.  Do something to regain confidence in yourself.