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Showing posts from December 20, 2009

Unboxing Girl Friend Day

^The EVF comes with a leather case while the lenses and external flash with their own pouch.Now that the Christmas holiday is over, the busyness subsides a bit. On Boxing Day, what's better than posting some photos of unboxing the GF-1 and the paraphernalia on loan to us?So here are photos of the GF-1 and some comparison photos of it versus other serious compacts.Compared to LX3The GF-1 is bigger in all dimensions.Compared to G10G10 is larger in size than the GF-1, except for the extra size of interchangeable lens.Compared to GX200The GF-1 is bigger, taller but as wide in length. When the GX200 is attached with the wide converter, both cameras are almost comparable in size.GF-1 with the external flash onObviously, GF-1 becomes quiet big with the external flash on.

Merry Christmas with Girl Friend no. 1

Merry Christmas from GX GARNERINGS to readers from around the world!  Whether you're having a Christmas celebration with friends or having a family get-together today, don't forget to make use of the opportunity to take great photos.  If you're using Ricoh cameras, be sure to send one to ricohforum for the photo contest for December themed on Christmas decorations.If you're observant enough, you'd have noticed that the photos here were taken with the Pany Girl Friend 1.  GF-1, that is.  I am carrying around the camera and testing it.  There are some gobsmacking and, naturally, gripping aspects as I can see having used it for a while.After thoroughly testing it, I'll find time to write an user's impressions in a journal sort of way.  For the time being, I still have days to…well…play with the Girl Friend.  My thanks go to Hong Kong's sole agent of Panasonic cameras for the loan.

Be Still, Busyness

^I like the wide perspective of this image with the blurry motions of passers-by.The incessant preparations for the Christmas Party and presents have been  going on for some time.  What a paradox we are so busy preparing for a festival of peace!As usual, I carried my camera around to the shopping, with the 19mm wide converter attached to it.  If you are using a camera with the possibility to add on a wide converter like my 19mm one, I'll surely recommend you to go for one.  It'll afford the images what I think a penetrating perspective into the scenes.^Decorating the street is a character from the book of a famous Taiwan Cartoonist Jimmy.At the same time, I looked for scenes to shot some photos about Christmas decorations for the monthly photo contest organised by ricohforum.  Oh, if Hong Kong is the hub of anything, it is first and foremost the hub of Christmas decorations.So despite the busyness, it is a season of peace.  But if you are doing shopping, thinking about what fo…

Let's Go to Hell

Christmas is a festive time to think about nativity and religion. In this city which is now a part of China, it is fitting to talk about the Chinese religious culture. The photos in the post are all about death in a way, mostly the unique paper offerings which you may not find them around unless you befriend a local who knows the way.This is the third post of an educational series to give you a glimpse into China's mysterious colours of folk religious beliefs.  You may be also interested to read some related old posts are here, here and here. ^Look what the dead will get from the paper offerings…sodas! Heineken!  The concept of hell in Christianity is for the unconverted whereas the Chinese version of hell is a place for all the deceased to "check in" (more on this later). Most interestingly, this hell is open for the living people from the temporal world to visit (Do the ghosts throw parties for the open house?). Therefore, unlike the hell in Christianity which is a pai…

A Potluck to Serve the Dead

Christmas is a festive time to think about nativity and religion. In this city which is now a part of China, it is fitting to talk about the Chinese religious culture. The photos in the post are all about death in a way, mostly the unique paper offerings which you may not find them around unless you befriend a local who knows the way.This is the second post of an educational series to give you a glimpse into China's mysterious colours of folk religious beliefs.  You may be also interested to read some related old posts are here, here and here. ^A paper Mercedes (Be a posh ghost!) the length of a man's height.  The plate says 168 which is the homonymic to "get rich all the way" in Cantonese, the language spoken in Southern China.Under the influence of Buddhism, the majority of Chinese people believe in reincarnation. At the same time, they hold dear the long tradition of ancestral worshipping passed down since around the founding of the Han Dynasty (founded 221 BC). I…

Entering Chinese Religious Minds

Christmas is a festive time to think about nativity and religion. In this city which is now a part of China, it is fitting to talk about the Chinese religious culture. The photos in the post are all about death in a way, mostly the unique paper offerings which you may not find them around unless you befriend a local who knows the way.This is an educational series to give you a glimpse into China's mysterious colours of folk religious beliefs.  You may be also interested to read some related old posts are here, here and here.
^Two almost life-size paper effigies representing a male and female servants to be burnt as offerings for the dead.China boasts a history of over 5 000 years. In this wide span of time, religion has taken root and grown leafy in the Chinese land of diversity. Apart from the home-grown Confucianism and Taoism, as well as Buddhism adopted from India, the folk religions are what truly represent the colourful and complex system of Chinese religious culture. These …